Posts tagged “Photography

Identifying art

Post by iSiZ

When I visit a museum, certainly some works of art touch me more than others. When that happens, ‘Wow, this is good, I want to spend some time here!’, I somehow seem to identify myself to that piece of art.

Why do some works of art touch me more than others? Where does that ‘Wow, this is good!’ come from? There may be many subconscious or conscious reasons for this. The artwork might be touching a topic that has played an important role in my life or I recognize a feeling I’ve had. Or it might summarize a personal characteristic, like order or neatness in an abstract painting. I even can get angry when I see a shitty work of art hanging in an established gallery, ‘How the f… did this come here!’

Contemporary art is a reflection of the society we live in, that is why we sometimes can identify ourselves to a piece of art, in a moment of recognition.

Phil Toledano has even made it his topic in his photography. His 2004 ‘Hope&Fear’ photograph series represents of what he believes the external manifestation of internal desires and paranoia that are adrift in contemporary American society. What are we afraid of? What do we love? How does our society function, and what does it worship?

Mr_Toledano_hands_eyesclosesmall

In, British writers and philosophers, Alain de Botton & John Armstrong latest book ‘Art as Therapy’ they claim art can self-help us with the problems of the soul. They introduce a new method of interpreting art: art as a form of therapy, providing powerful solutions to many of life’s problems.

From 25 April 2014, Alain de Botton & John Armstrong will be showing in the Rijksmuseum what art can mean to visitors.

Watch this interesting introduction, a 45 minute lecture by Alain de Botton about ‘Art as Therapy’:

 

 


Migration is just another pit stop

Post by iSiZ

We have started the research for our new project, to be realized next year, about immigration. More about it soon! As we advance the research we find interesting projects already out there on the internet about immigration.

Like this video made by Nadja Haugas. The two minute video is about the places her family has migrated to in their lives. She begins with her grandfather migrating from Sweden to Estonia. Mentions her grandmother’s, father’s, mother’s and her own migrations. By the end of the film it gives me a sense of: ‘It doesn’t matter where you go, it is just another pit stop.’

The second video is made by Nicolas Lefaucheux. Migrating means leaving your home. For some people more than others it means dealing with homesick feelings. Nicolas tries to define homesickness in this short animation film.

 

 


POPPY shows the dark side of globalisation

Post by iSiZ

Poppy is an exhibition and book by Robert Knoth and Antoinette de Jong. Launched on 31st of march 2012 at the Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam. After visiting the exhibition last year, I left the building relieved and happy, a huge contrast with the topic of the audiovisual installation.

Obviously we must be grateful these courageous independent journalists covered this incredible story for many years and from so many perspectives. But as a creator I was so happy to see a beautiful multimedia production telling a story with all the media available: audio, still images, moving images, text, paper and ink.

The production is selected for the shortlist Dutch Doc Awards 2013. From 26 april 2013 the presentation will be exhibited in het Tropenmuseum in Amsterdam, together with the other nominees. 5th of june 2013 the winner will be presented.

Watch the trailer of the Poppy audiovisual installation below.

 

source: ydocfoundation.org

‘The Silk Road has linked the East and the West from time immemorial. Once a renowned trade route, it transferred religions and cultures, the Silk Road has now turned into a heroin route and is carving out a path of violence and destruction through one of the world’s most strategic yet volatile regions while on its way to the end of its destinations in Europe. Robert Knoth and Antoinette de Jong documented the route for two decades, covering the rise of the Taliban, the American intervention after September 9/11 and the recent surge in opium production. The images and texts in the publication and the audiovisual installation reveal a dark side of globalisation, as reflected in the faces of smugglers, prisoners, prostitutes, border guards, children and farmers.’

 

 


What makes a photograph powerful?

Post by iSiZ

Besides composition, framing and the availability of light what makes a photograph more special than others? Do you know already? Watch this 2 minute video anyway. The photographs and narrator tell us the story of life.


Special crowdfunding project: Stories from Southeast

Post by iSiZ

Blue Dress Pictures has launched a new and exciting project that is to be realized through crowdfunding. The documentary is about the much discussed Southeast district of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

In this documentary we will portray an almost unknown image of Southeast Amsterdam: an honest and personal image about its real life.

In four personal portraits of people who work or live there, we show how the district Amsterdam Southeast affects their lives. The trailer of the movie introduces one of the four persons, Gerard, a photographer. It moves him as he notices that his grandson, who has dark skin, sometimes experiences this as something negative.

Watch the trailer:

 

The subject of the film, cultural differences, can be used as an instrument for polarization, intolerance and destruction. By reducing culture back to its essence, the individual man, the film attempts to paint a clear picture in an otherwise clouded subject.

For the first time we are attempting to have a project financed through crowdfunding. Therefore we have placed the documentary on the online crowdfunding platform voordekunst.

We have until the 21st of october 2012 to get the full funding of 18.150 euro. We still need to raise 68% of the total fund before this beautiful project can see the light.

You can help us make history by donating to this project. For every donation we will send you a reward. Check the rewards and how you can donate should you not be a resident in Holland by going to the information page on this blog.

For people backing the project from abroad, you’ll receive your reward by post and a private link to preview the English version of the documentary online. All the sponsors will be welcome to see the film on a big screen coming January. The film will be featured in a special preview movie night in Amsterdam Southeast. After which it will be send to various film festival around the world.

You can also support our project by sharing this project with your friends on facebook, twitter, wordpress or other social media platforms you’re connected to. We really hope you’ll find this project worth-while and hope to welcome you as a sponsor and friend!

Kind Regard,
iSiZ

 


It brings colour into our early lives… The Autochrome

Autochrome published Aug 1925 issue of National Geographic

In 1907 one of the worlds first successful method for producing colour pictures, produced Impressionist-like images with delicate colors. In 2006 the feature film The Illusionist tried to recreate the look.

Autochrome published Aug 1925 issue of National Geographic

This process of early colour photography was called the Autochrome, it was a complicated process using, of all things… potatoes. Autochrome photographs are produced by a glass plate coated on one side with dyed grains of potato starch under a silverhalide emulsion.

The Lumière brothers patented the autochrome lumiere in 1903 and it was first marketed for broader use in 1907.

In 1909 Albert Kahn, a millionaire French banker sent his photographers to more than 50 countries. Their photographs and films documented the collapse of the Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian empires, the last traditional Celtic villages in Ireland and the soldiers of the First World War. Get inspired by this man and his ambitious project to document the world. Watch one part of the BBC series The Wonderful World of Albert Kahn here.