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Identifying art

Post by iSiZ

When I visit a museum, certainly some works of art touch me more than others. When that happens, ‘Wow, this is good, I want to spend some time here!’, I somehow seem to identify myself to that piece of art.

Why do some works of art touch me more than others? Where does that ‘Wow, this is good!’ come from? There may be many subconscious or conscious reasons for this. The artwork might be touching a topic that has played an important role in my life or I recognize a feeling I’ve had. Or it might summarize a personal characteristic, like order or neatness in an abstract painting. I even can get angry when I see a shitty work of art hanging in an established gallery, ‘How the f… did this come here!’

Contemporary art is a reflection of the society we live in, that is why we sometimes can identify ourselves to a piece of art, in a moment of recognition.

Phil Toledano has even made it his topic in his photography. His 2004 ‘Hope&Fear’ photograph series represents of what he believes the external manifestation of internal desires and paranoia that are adrift in contemporary American society. What are we afraid of? What do we love? How does our society function, and what does it worship?

Mr_Toledano_hands_eyesclosesmall

In, British writers and philosophers, Alain de Botton & John Armstrong latest book ‘Art as Therapy’ they claim art can self-help us with the problems of the soul. They introduce a new method of interpreting art: art as a form of therapy, providing powerful solutions to many of life’s problems.

From 25 April 2014, Alain de Botton & John Armstrong will be showing in the Rijksmuseum what art can mean to visitors.

Watch this interesting introduction, a 45 minute lecture by Alain de Botton about ‘Art as Therapy’:

 

 

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From everyday objects into something extraordinary

post by Meltem Akturk

Kazuki Guzmán is an Chilean/Japanese artist. He takes everyday objects and turns them into something extraordinary. From his chili sauce portrait on japanese rice delicate, banana illustrations using thousands of delicately placed needle piercings to a miniature chewing gum sculpture, his works are embedded with a delightful sense of humor. Via his web site:
‘My father is a macho Chilean and my mother is a delicate lady from Japan. Because of them, my work reflects not only the things I love, but also my most essential character traits…My artworks are often the accidental outcome of playful interactions between the materials and myself.’

http://videos.huffingtonpost.com/artist-uses-everyday-items-to-create-sculptures-517874972

Schermafbeelding 2014-01-13 om 17.05.35

The Great Wave and New Technologies

Post by iSiZ

The Great Wave is an ukiyo-e print by Japanese artist Hokusai, made between 1830-1833. One of the best recognized works of Japanese art in the world. This beautiful print shows us a wave of the open sea in an area around Mount Fuji in Japan.

The Great Wave off Kanagawa

When in abundance, the important role of clean water in our lives is easily forgotten. Images of people in less fortunate places, like a tsunami, makes us remember. In 2004 Michael Pritchard sat at his Christmas diner when he saw the South Asian tsunami on television. It inspired him to develop LIFESAVER® technology. The LIFESAVER® bottle filters all bacteria from polluted water down to 15 nanometres, making it clean to drink. Another scientist Cezar Harada is in de process of developing a prototype of Protei, an open hardware oil spill cleaning device.

These are just two of the amazing technologies developed in recent years.

Sustainable design

Post by Meltem Akturk

Isaac Monté of atelier monté has created the ‘filter factory’.On every three hundredth cigarette which is disposed of, a door pops open and the ‘lucky smoker’ is gifted with a birdhouse. The birdhouses are made in large waffle iron. The shredded cigarette filters are melted into the waffle iron and pressed into a birdhouse.The project makes one think about people’s daily actions and how we can harness our so-called bad habits for good.

Migration is just another pit stop

Post by iSiZ

We have started the research for our new project, to be realized next year, about immigration. More about it soon! As we advance the research we find interesting projects already out there on the internet about immigration.

Like this video made by Nadja Haugas. The two minute video is about the places her family has migrated to in their lives. She begins with her grandfather migrating from Sweden to Estonia. Mentions her grandmother’s, father’s, mother’s and her own migrations. By the end of the film it gives me a sense of: ‘It doesn’t matter where you go, it is just another pit stop.’

The second video is made by Nicolas Lefaucheux. Migrating means leaving your home. For some people more than others it means dealing with homesick feelings. Nicolas tries to define homesickness in this short animation film.

 

 

Discover Typography

Post by Meltem Akturk

Type:Rider is a videogame for smartphones, tablets and desktop-computers that makes you discover the unexcepted world of typography.

It’s really interesting and great game. You would learn more about the visual design of type and what those choices mean to the books and texts we read.

Between The Folds, about origami and life

Post by iSiZ

Did you know you can make any shape by the process of folding paper and one straight cut?

A must watch documentary! Vanessa Goulding’s film about origami, it is also about science, art and mathematics, ‘Between The Folds’ was produced in 2009 and has won various awards at film festivals.

Vanessa: ‘There are many talented and innovative people choosing to work in paper and 2D surfaces—engineers, architects, sculptors, scientists and fine artists. So many of them deserve attention, and have beautiful work and ideas to share. In a way, the film only reveals the tip of the iceberg.’

It is an interesting documentary about what origami can bring to our lifes.

Klick through to see the film on youtube.

 

Origami_Kalami_photo