Inspiration

Paper animation about Alzheimer

Post by Meltem Akturk

Suus Hessling made this stop motion video about Alzheimer’s disease for her graduation at the School of Arts in Utrecht, Netherlands.

It’s a really good paper animation, great details on her models. Very appropriate technique and materials selected to tell the story. This makes it so much easier to understand the context in comparison to text.

Advertisements

Marcel Wanders – Pinned up

Post by Meltem Akturk

Marcel Wanders (Boxtel, 1963) is a product/interior designer and art director in the Powerhouse studio in Amsterdam. He became internationally known for its furniture, interiors and original art direction. He is recognized as one of the most distinguished designers working today.

The exhibition  ‘Pinned up’ at the Stedelijk Museum presents designs from Wanders’ entire oeuvre, ranging from the late 1980s to the present. I think everybody will enjoy his original designs.

The piece highlights Wanders’ focus on sustainability and joyfulness, creating products, he says, that aim to ‘serve you for the rest of your life’.

 

 


The First 3-D Printed Book Cover

Post by Meltem Akturk

The world’s first 3-D printed book cover is a novel by Chang-Rae Lee “On Such a Full Sea” published by Riverhead Books. Helen Yentus, the art director of Riverhead Books says about the making of the slipcover “We’re looking for new ways to present our books that give people the opportunity to have something to hold onto that’s not available in digital form,”

It’s beautifully designed book and a very beautiful application of the 3d printer, it’s more an object than a normal book.


A Brochure Made Entirely Without Energy

Post by Meltem Akturk

This brochure was designed and printed using techniques that didn’t require any electricity. It was a campaing of the electricity company EDP Group that tries to bring electricity to isolated communities in regions like the Amazon and Sub-Saharan Africa. In response, the designteam of Leo Burnett Lisboa decided to produce the commissioned brochure without the use of any electricity.

Actually, we are so dependent on industry, economy and technology for even the most basic of our everyday activities but this video shows us how difficult is it to make only a basic brochure without electricity.


Identifying art

Post by iSiZ

When I visit a museum, certainly some works of art touch me more than others. When that happens, ‘Wow, this is good, I want to spend some time here!’, I somehow seem to identify myself to that piece of art.

Why do some works of art touch me more than others? Where does that ‘Wow, this is good!’ come from? There may be many subconscious or conscious reasons for this. The artwork might be touching a topic that has played an important role in my life or I recognize a feeling I’ve had. Or it might summarize a personal characteristic, like order or neatness in an abstract painting. I even can get angry when I see a shitty work of art hanging in an established gallery, ‘How the f… did this come here!’

Contemporary art is a reflection of the society we live in, that is why we sometimes can identify ourselves to a piece of art, in a moment of recognition.

Phil Toledano has even made it his topic in his photography. His 2004 ‘Hope&Fear’ photograph series represents of what he believes the external manifestation of internal desires and paranoia that are adrift in contemporary American society. What are we afraid of? What do we love? How does our society function, and what does it worship?

Mr_Toledano_hands_eyesclosesmall

In, British writers and philosophers, Alain de Botton & John Armstrong latest book ‘Art as Therapy’ they claim art can self-help us with the problems of the soul. They introduce a new method of interpreting art: art as a form of therapy, providing powerful solutions to many of life’s problems.

From 25 April 2014, Alain de Botton & John Armstrong will be showing in the Rijksmuseum what art can mean to visitors.

Watch this interesting introduction, a 45 minute lecture by Alain de Botton about ‘Art as Therapy’:

 

 


From everyday objects into something extraordinary

post by Meltem Akturk

Kazuki Guzmán is an Chilean/Japanese artist. He takes everyday objects and turns them into something extraordinary. From his chili sauce portrait on japanese rice delicate, banana illustrations using thousands of delicately placed needle piercings to a miniature chewing gum sculpture, his works are embedded with a delightful sense of humor. Via his web site:
‘My father is a macho Chilean and my mother is a delicate lady from Japan. Because of them, my work reflects not only the things I love, but also my most essential character traits…My artworks are often the accidental outcome of playful interactions between the materials and myself.’

http://videos.huffingtonpost.com/artist-uses-everyday-items-to-create-sculptures-517874972

Schermafbeelding 2014-01-13 om 17.05.35


Discover Typography

Post by Meltem Akturk

Type:Rider is a videogame for smartphones, tablets and desktop-computers that makes you discover the unexcepted world of typography.

It’s really interesting and great game. You would learn more about the visual design of type and what those choices mean to the books and texts we read.