Identity

Identifying art

Post by iSiZ

When I visit a museum, certainly some works of art touch me more than others. When that happens, ‘Wow, this is good, I want to spend some time here!’, I somehow seem to identify myself to that piece of art.

Why do some works of art touch me more than others? Where does that ‘Wow, this is good!’ come from? There may be many subconscious or conscious reasons for this. The artwork might be touching a topic that has played an important role in my life or I recognize a feeling I’ve had. Or it might summarize a personal characteristic, like order or neatness in an abstract painting. I even can get angry when I see a shitty work of art hanging in an established gallery, ‘How the f… did this come here!’

Contemporary art is a reflection of the society we live in, that is why we sometimes can identify ourselves to a piece of art, in a moment of recognition.

Phil Toledano has even made it his topic in his photography. His 2004 ‘Hope&Fear’ photograph series represents of what he believes the external manifestation of internal desires and paranoia that are adrift in contemporary American society. What are we afraid of? What do we love? How does our society function, and what does it worship?

Mr_Toledano_hands_eyesclosesmall

In, British writers and philosophers, Alain de Botton & John Armstrong latest book ‘Art as Therapy’ they claim art can self-help us with the problems of the soul. They introduce a new method of interpreting art: art as a form of therapy, providing powerful solutions to many of life’s problems.

From 25 April 2014, Alain de Botton & John Armstrong will be showing in the Rijksmuseum what art can mean to visitors.

Watch this interesting introduction, a 45 minute lecture by Alain de Botton about ‘Art as Therapy’:

 

 


‘Curiosity and appreciation enables the muscle of imagination’

Post by iSiZ

In the six minute documentary below, Michael Wolff, co-founder of Branding Agency Wolff Olins, explains his muscles of seeing.  At an early age he notices how visually curious or visually conscious he was. He explains how designers get shoved into silo’s by being called a graphic designer, a product designer or an architect. More than anything he appreciates the holistic approach of looking at the world with muscles of curiosity, appreciation and imagination.

Just like a child it is very important to live your life and keep a sense of amazement and curiosity. I try to remind myself every now and then, when I have one of those clear moments.


Portrait of the physical and the psychological

Post by iSiZ

Sergio Albiac creates, what he calls videorative portraits, a more “realistic” contemporary portrait of the physical and the psychological. His working process involves writing computer programs that generate these images. Like de video below, a collage of a person’s (video) memories that show up in the portrait.

The artist wanted to express the interior world of a human being, through memories, emotions, relationships and personal story. This is how he goes about generating a portrait:

‘Painting a Videorative portrait starts with collecting personal videos of the person portrayed, tagged by him/her with relevant concepts and descriptions. Then, using a custom developed tool, he “paints with meanings” and generates a video portrait, subtitled with generative personal narratives. In the interactive installation version of the work, the viewer can “navigate” through the subject’s mind, opening his/her video memories, accessing their thoughts and revealing hidden connections between the meanings, using real time access to Wikipedia to infer related emotional states.’


First Teaser Trailer Stories from Southeast

Post by Jos

Because of all the support we received for our crowdfunding project, we’re able to concentrate on the production of our documentary Stories from Southeast. We will keep you posted on any significant developments through this blog and the Facebook page. We start with the first teaser trailer that comes with this post. Think of it as a visual appetizer. We hope it will give you an appetite for more.

 

The main course, the public premiere, will be held in the Southeast district op Amsterdam this September. We shouldn’t risk missing that deadline, before you know it the Southeast district of Amsterdam won’t exist anymore. Okay, that might be overstating it a bit, but as an official place name the Southeast district of Amsterdam will seize to exist from May 2014. Who knows, our documentary may end up being the source of the final, authentic images of this lost piece of Amsterdam… ;-)

We will continue working on the movie and we’ll be sure to let you know when we can give you another appetizer.


Special crowdfunding project: Stories from Southeast

Post by iSiZ

Blue Dress Pictures has launched a new and exciting project that is to be realized through crowdfunding. The documentary is about the much discussed Southeast district of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

In this documentary we will portray an almost unknown image of Southeast Amsterdam: an honest and personal image about its real life.

In four personal portraits of people who work or live there, we show how the district Amsterdam Southeast affects their lives. The trailer of the movie introduces one of the four persons, Gerard, a photographer. It moves him as he notices that his grandson, who has dark skin, sometimes experiences this as something negative.

Watch the trailer:

 

The subject of the film, cultural differences, can be used as an instrument for polarization, intolerance and destruction. By reducing culture back to its essence, the individual man, the film attempts to paint a clear picture in an otherwise clouded subject.

For the first time we are attempting to have a project financed through crowdfunding. Therefore we have placed the documentary on the online crowdfunding platform voordekunst.

We have until the 21st of october 2012 to get the full funding of 18.150 euro. We still need to raise 68% of the total fund before this beautiful project can see the light.

You can help us make history by donating to this project. For every donation we will send you a reward. Check the rewards and how you can donate should you not be a resident in Holland by going to the information page on this blog.

For people backing the project from abroad, you’ll receive your reward by post and a private link to preview the English version of the documentary online. All the sponsors will be welcome to see the film on a big screen coming January. The film will be featured in a special preview movie night in Amsterdam Southeast. After which it will be send to various film festival around the world.

You can also support our project by sharing this project with your friends on facebook, twitter, wordpress or other social media platforms you’re connected to. We really hope you’ll find this project worth-while and hope to welcome you as a sponsor and friend!

Kind Regard,
iSiZ

 


Portrait Photography, it must of been very exciting to have your pictures taken

Post by iSiZ

It must of been very exciting to have your pictures taken in a studio in the first half century of the 20th century. Jacob Merkelbach (1877-1942) was the founder of one of Amsterdam’s most famous photography studios in the twentieth century specializing in portrait photography. The studio was located above fashionstore Hirsch & Cie at Leidseplein, Amsterdam (now housing The Apple Store). He received customers from the upper layer of the bourgeoisie, but also from the world of theater, dance, cabaret and film.

The Amsterdam Art Foundation is commissioning portrait photographers to make contemporary works of portrait photography inspired on the theme identity. The City Archives of Amsterdam is setting up a crowdfunding project for the development of an exhibition and a website on Portrait Photography. The aim is to raise enough funds to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Atelier Merkelbach. Everybody will be able to upload their personal family portrait pictures to the website. We are very excited about the project and can’t wait to see the results. We’ll keep you posted!