Art

Marcel Wanders – Pinned up

Post by Meltem Akturk

Marcel Wanders (Boxtel, 1963) is a product/interior designer and art director in the Powerhouse studio in Amsterdam. He became internationally known for its furniture, interiors and original art direction. He is recognized as one of the most distinguished designers working today.

The exhibition  ‘Pinned up’ at the Stedelijk Museum presents designs from Wanders’ entire oeuvre, ranging from the late 1980s to the present. I think everybody will enjoy his original designs.

The piece highlights Wanders’ focus on sustainability and joyfulness, creating products, he says, that aim to ‘serve you for the rest of your life’.

 

 

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Identifying art

Post by iSiZ

When I visit a museum, certainly some works of art touch me more than others. When that happens, ‘Wow, this is good, I want to spend some time here!’, I somehow seem to identify myself to that piece of art.

Why do some works of art touch me more than others? Where does that ‘Wow, this is good!’ come from? There may be many subconscious or conscious reasons for this. The artwork might be touching a topic that has played an important role in my life or I recognize a feeling I’ve had. Or it might summarize a personal characteristic, like order or neatness in an abstract painting. I even can get angry when I see a shitty work of art hanging in an established gallery, ‘How the f… did this come here!’

Contemporary art is a reflection of the society we live in, that is why we sometimes can identify ourselves to a piece of art, in a moment of recognition.

Phil Toledano has even made it his topic in his photography. His 2004 ‘Hope&Fear’ photograph series represents of what he believes the external manifestation of internal desires and paranoia that are adrift in contemporary American society. What are we afraid of? What do we love? How does our society function, and what does it worship?

Mr_Toledano_hands_eyesclosesmall

In, British writers and philosophers, Alain de Botton & John Armstrong latest book ‘Art as Therapy’ they claim art can self-help us with the problems of the soul. They introduce a new method of interpreting art: art as a form of therapy, providing powerful solutions to many of life’s problems.

From 25 April 2014, Alain de Botton & John Armstrong will be showing in the Rijksmuseum what art can mean to visitors.

Watch this interesting introduction, a 45 minute lecture by Alain de Botton about ‘Art as Therapy’:

 

 


From everyday objects into something extraordinary

post by Meltem Akturk

Kazuki Guzmán is an Chilean/Japanese artist. He takes everyday objects and turns them into something extraordinary. From his chili sauce portrait on japanese rice delicate, banana illustrations using thousands of delicately placed needle piercings to a miniature chewing gum sculpture, his works are embedded with a delightful sense of humor. Via his web site:
‘My father is a macho Chilean and my mother is a delicate lady from Japan. Because of them, my work reflects not only the things I love, but also my most essential character traits…My artworks are often the accidental outcome of playful interactions between the materials and myself.’

http://videos.huffingtonpost.com/artist-uses-everyday-items-to-create-sculptures-517874972

Schermafbeelding 2014-01-13 om 17.05.35


A stunning piece of moving city life

Post by iSiZ

I’m fascinated by the beautiful patterns and shapes a kaleidoscope makes. Last year I posted an article about a Human Arabesque made from a 18-meter high kaleidoscope, read about it here.

Filmer and photographer Michael Shainblum has experimented with mirroring images and video for the past five years and has come up with a moving piece of city life  in ‘Mirror City’. He visually lures you through the cities of Chicago, San Francisco, San Diego, Las Vegas and Los Angeles.

Watch how he combines timelapse photography with kaleidoscope effects and reduces city life into ‘city-shapes’, ‘city-movements’ and ‘city-lights’. Whenever I watch a kaleidoscope made from landscapes, I can’t stop but wonder ‘Does a parallel universe look like this?’


Wrapping of landscape or buildings

Post by Meltem

Christo (Javacheff) and Jeanne-Claude (de Guillebon) are husband and wife and were born on the same day in 1935, he in Bulgaria and she in Morocco. Christo studied art in Sofia and in Prague. Jeanne-Claude studied Latin and philosophy in Tunis. They met in Paris in 1958. Since that time they have collaborated on an impressive oeuvre of artistic work. The wrapping of the Reichstag in the summer of 1995 once again placed the Christos in the spotlight of the international art world, a center stage position they have held several times before: in 1991 during the installation of The Umbrellas, Japan-U.S.A., 1984-91; in 1985, with The Pont Neuf Wrapped, Paris, 1975-1985; in 1976, with the installation of the Running Fence, Sonoma and Marin Counties, California, 1972-76; and so on back to their first collaborations in 1961 on the docks of the Cologne harbor.


Portrait of the physical and the psychological

Post by iSiZ

Sergio Albiac creates, what he calls videorative portraits, a more “realistic” contemporary portrait of the physical and the psychological. His working process involves writing computer programs that generate these images. Like de video below, a collage of a person’s (video) memories that show up in the portrait.

The artist wanted to express the interior world of a human being, through memories, emotions, relationships and personal story. This is how he goes about generating a portrait:

‘Painting a Videorative portrait starts with collecting personal videos of the person portrayed, tagged by him/her with relevant concepts and descriptions. Then, using a custom developed tool, he “paints with meanings” and generates a video portrait, subtitled with generative personal narratives. In the interactive installation version of the work, the viewer can “navigate” through the subject’s mind, opening his/her video memories, accessing their thoughts and revealing hidden connections between the meanings, using real time access to Wikipedia to infer related emotional states.’


John Lasseter – A Day in a Life

Post by iSiZ

Aren’t you curious how a day in the life of John Lasseter, chief creative officer of Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios, is like? Here’s an entertaining 25 minute documentary of a day in his life.

 

At the moment there is a nice overview exhibition in Amsterdam until the 27th of oktober 2013. Enough time, so make sure to catch this one! The exhibition is called: ‘Pixar: 25 Years of Animation’. There is a lot to see; original models, old animationfilms, special installations with storyboards, sketches, paintings, clay figures and more. This exhibition breathes passion, creativity and technology. Have a peak behind the scene’s and get inspired!

Under this link you’ll find a full length documentary on ‘The Pixar story’.